[ Audible ] The Exorcist Author William Peter Blatty – Andy-palmer.co.uk


  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 385 pages
  • The Exorcist
  • William Peter Blatty
  • English
  • 22 August 2019
  • 0061007226

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The ExorcistFour decades after it first terrified the world, William Peter Blatty s The Exorcist is back An extraordinary classic work of horror and dark paranormal suspense In this stunning th Anniversary Edition, a desperate mother and two priests fight to free the soul of a little girl from a supernatural entity of pure malevolence Scared the heck out of me Curiosity compels you to read this THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS It was kinda hard to decide the rating on this novel If I d think only on the raw reading experience, I would say that it was a 3 star material.However, I had to ponder about the whole additional info and further development of characters compared with my experience with the film adaptation which certainly is one of my favorite horror films So, I think that the fairest rating is giving a solid 4 star rating.Certainly due a Curiosity compels you to read this THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS It was kinda hard to decide the rating on this novel If I d think only on the raw reading experience, I would say that it was a 3 star material.However, I had to ponder about the whole additional info and further development of characters compared with my experience with the film adaptation which certainly is one of my favorite horror films So, I think that the fairest rating is giving a solid 4 star rating.Certainly due all those deeper details in the original book, I think that novel movie make an irresistible combo to do.You watched the film, and then you ll appreciate eventhe extended information that you ll find in the original novel, but in matters of frightening, well the movie has a clear advantage, but don t dismiss the novel so quickly.Since, may be not the best horror novel that I ve ever read,but certainly the book hassomething to compel you to read it, and have it a huge respect to it MOVIE V BOOK DAWN OF POSSESSION I am not surprised if almost any reader has watched the film before reading the novel And my case wasn t any different.I have watched the three film versions Original theatrical, The Never Before Seen version and the Extended Director s Cut Any comment that I d make in this review about the film adaptation it will be based on the latest mentioned version, the Extended Director s Cut , due it s the most complete and also it s the one that I have on Blu ray so it s the one that I havefresh on my mind.It s interesting how the film is generally accepted as the most terrifying movie of all time, while the novel doesn t keep that distinction Actually the debate about which novel is the most terrifying of all, it s an endless dispute that I m sure the general reading community never would be able to agree in a specific novel.While the imagination is the best special effects generator, I have to admit that it wasn t so shocking to read scenes than in the visual presentation where they are truly scary Even, I don t know if there was the choice of words used in the narrative of the book, since I think that I d some technical difficulties to visualize some of those scenes, if I wouldn t have previous notion of how they supposed to look like, thanks to the film PLAYING DEVIL S ADVOCATE So, I am still glad of having read the original novel, since not matter the film adaptation covered the most important elements of the general storyline the novel indeed gives you enlighting info about the background of the characters, even new characters that didn t appear on the movie version, and deeper development of many of the scenes.On the film, you never have doubt that there is a demon inside of Regan,but in the novel, there are plausible scenarios causing suspicions on other characters, with the chance of arational explanation So, not so ironically, in the same way that you have faith to believe in God, well, the story requires of you to have faith to believe in the existence of The Devil.That, it s something so curious about many priests in Catholic Church, that I understand that there must be an investigation to discard a simpler explanation to some situations, but it seems that if you say that you re possessed by The Devil or to the contrary, you were witness of the word of God, in any case, the priests will see you as a perfect nut job to send to some psychiatric asylum.So, while the priests are supposed to believe in God, it s like they don t want to believe in the existence of The Devil, that s it s quite odd, since they are both sides of the same religious coin Also, some elements in the novel, that you may perceive as random in the film version, even not clarify enough for really understanding why they are in the story, those elements are well developed on the novel and even making ties to the demon inside Regan that you may didn t think about before.Moreover, some reactions and conducts of the characters, knowing key info about their pasts, you can rationalize better why they are reacting in such ways Even some conversations, they are the same in terms of dialogue, but the mood of them are perceived in a different way in the book, giving some new angles to the dynamics between characters SPEAKING OF THE DEVIL That s exactly what I expect when I decide to read a book original novel or novelization when I already watched the film adaptation.Since while I invest only two hours to watch the movie, I can invest like a week orto read a novel So, if I read just the exact story on the book, I think that it would kinda pointless, but if I got enough additional info,certainly then, it was well invested time.I think that the most effective element on the construction of the story is that you get a lot of arguments and plausible explanations of what it s going on, so in some reverse psychology gimmick, you get to believeandthat Regan is indeed possessed by a demon While in some other novels where they approach the paranormal angle directly, the reader tends to accept it without a doubt.Maybe you don t believe in The Devil or in God even, but don t worry,since you also can say that you don t believe in Jupiter the planet, not the Roman god and that doesn t make that that planet isn t out there Many people are atheists until they have to face a demon by themselves.And it s not like that I am saying that you have to believe in the Christian God, since while I am Catholic, my wish is only that all people believe in some higher power, that you may name whatever you prefer, but believe, in something higher than us.Since some others may call as unrealistic, to believe in gods or higher powers,for me, not believing in some higher power, I d call it as sad.Believe in God Beware of The Devil Both are real, not matter if you believe in them or not.Getting back to the book, I recommend the novel for any fan of the film and wishing to get a deeper developement on the story.P.S Updated Jan, 13th, 2017 I just knew that William Peter Blatty passed away I m glad that I was able to read his most iconic work way before he would die A masterpieceunqualified, unadulterated and unequaled How better to describe the definitive, 40th Anniversary edition of one of THE classic horror novels of the 20th centuryrendered in audio format and narrated with passion, verve and pitch perfect delivery by William P Blatty himself.I ve seen both the original and extended, remastered versions of The Exorcist several times and believe it ranks among the finest horror films ever made Until this week, I had never read the source nov A masterpieceunqualified, unadulterated and unequaled How better to describe the definitive, 40th Anniversary edition of one of THE classic horror novels of the 20th centuryrendered in audio format and narrated with passion, verve and pitch perfect delivery by William P Blatty himself.I ve seen both the original and extended, remastered versions of The Exorcist several times and believe it ranks among the finest horror films ever made Until this week, I had never read the source novel Now that I have, let me add to the film s list of accolades that it s also one of the best film adaptations of a classic novel that I have experienced along with The Princess Bride and No Country for Old Men I m going to test the limb and walk out onto it by assuming that most people, even if for some inexplicable or metaphysical reason have not either read the book or seen the movie, are familiar enough with the basic plot that I can dispense with any fear of spoilers A sweet, pre teen girl gets soul jacked by a demon and proceeds to expel various manner of noxious excreta from her various orifices while hurlingbarbs and insults than a Don Rickles standup routine Throw in a grizzled exorcist, a dogged detective and a Jesuit priest with serious mommy issues whose suffering a crisis of faith and you ve got the playbill for this diabolical dance of dread Thus, wifhout worrying about spoilage, I am going to mention briefly what struck me most about the book and then finish with a quick compare and contrast describing where I thought the film and the novel, respectively, were the superior product First and foremost, the single most impressive aspect of the book for me was the dense, lushtastically, beautiful prose employed by Blatty while converting this story from mind to paper Given that Blatty did not become a prolific author to my knowledge at least , I always assumed that the novel was standard fair that had just received a fabulous hollywood makeover into a successful film Not only was I all the way wrong, but the film actually loses the rich psychologically melodramatic flavor of Blatty s verse In the novel, everything is hyper real and a casual look or a fleeting feeling might be imbued with vast significance A little like an updated version of Lovecraft meets Tolstoy meets Kafka I thought it was wonderful and attained the rank of esteemed literature in my opinion A heart felt BOO YAH to Mr Blatty for his slick, stylish sentencing Okay, let s compare a contrast shall we.Movie was Better than the Book Warning shots from the film below may be shocking to some The visual effects employed in the movie were so megascream scary at a gut level that they had my twig and berries crawling up my tummy to nuzzle against my liver Thus, most of the following are moments in which the written word of Blatty just couldn t compete on the terror scale with the film Beginning with 1 The Face of Evil The transformation of nice, innocent Linda Blair into one of the foulest, fugliest freak shows in film history is something that the book could not adequately convey The mismatched, demonic eyesthe pasty, cracked and scrobiculated skin, the raspyBarry White with a head cold voiceit s enough to cause temporary motor ataxia The book, as good as it was, could not match this kind of visual perfection for visceral terror.2 The Crucifix Scene We all know the scene I m talking about so let s not belabor the point and allow this to slide into something we might all regret Let s all just back away and proceed without further comment, except maybe a cringing ouch baby, very ouch 3 The Owl Head scene Up next afterthe 1 thing never to do with a Crucifixis the immediately following scene in which little Regan does the full 360 degree, spine defying glance around I almost dropped my digesting dinner when I first saw it If you are ever feeling irregular, this scene works better than a bran muffin and cup of coffee 4 The Crab Walk scene Only in the extended version, this bit of demonic gymnastics really shivered my timbers 5 Three words Max Van Sydow Nuff said The Book was Better than the Movie In general, in almost every particular beyond the items mentioned above, the book was superior to the film and in some cases vastly so Here are just the top reasons that come to mind.1 Again, the Writing I know, I knowI mentioned this above but dammit it really is that good Blatty s prose sucks you in with his vivid, impassioned prose that employs over the top nuance to make every step in the story feel like a necessary, critical piece of the puzzle I can understand some feeling smothered by the narrative, but I found it enthralling 2 The Demon This was one of several key pieces of information that did not translate well on the screen The film leads the audience to believe that the demon possessing Regan is Satan himself This is based in the quote I m Father Karras and the response and I m the Devil However, the book goes on to make clear that the demon is actually just thata demon named Pazuzu This ties into the beginning of the film 3 Is it Real The movie leaves no doubt that Regan was possessed and that she is saved when the demon jumps ship into Father Karras before the now possessed priest does a Greg Louganis out of the window While mostly free from doubt, the novel does a superb job of leaving just enough of a crack open so that the question is never completely answered I thought this added a substrate of eeriness to the story 4 Father Dyer and Detective Kinderman I may be one of the few people that loved Exorcist III not to be confused with the visual turd known as Exorcist II One of my favorite aspects of E3 was the witty banter and close friendship between Father Dyer and Bill Kinderman played by George C Scott Turns out a chunk of their dialogue came from this book and their relationship is developed to a significant extent in these pages Major bonus for me 5 The Smell and Sound of Evil Just as the book could not compete with the visual perfection of the film, the film could not for obvious reasons come close to imbuing its telling with the stench described in the novel The number of times Regan befouls her bed and deposits her insides as an act of belligerence towards Regan s mom or the priests is an aspect of the novel that adds to the vileness of the demon inhabiting this sweet little girl Also, the dialogue is farsevere in the book than the movie could likely have gotten away with at the time 6 Satanic Worship One fascinating aspect of the novel that was completely cut from the film is the in depth and detailed depiction of Satanic worship and some of the disgusting, sacrilegious practices performed at black masses This was almost wholly absent in the film but made for compelling reading Overall, I loved the movie but think the novel far surpasses it in its artistic merit It is a true classic and one that I can not give a stronger recommendation for fans of horror This was a special and very memorable experience Thank you, Mr Blatty 5.0 stars HIGHEST POSSIBLE RECOMMENDATION I Strange as it may seem, I hadn t watched the film version ofThe Exorcistuntil last summer I know, shame on me, but you see, I thought I wouldn t be able to take it seriously I don t believe in possessions or devils or any of these things, although I love to read about them Of course, I knew of Blatty s novel and I was aware of the cutie little green Pazuzu face of young Regan, but since I don t believe in the main theme of the story, I knew I wouldn t be able to appreciate the film, rig Strange as it may seem, I hadn t watched the film version ofThe Exorcistuntil last summer I know, shame on me, but you see, I thought I wouldn t be able to take it seriously I don t believe in possessions or devils or any of these things, although I love to read about them Of course, I knew of Blatty s novel and I was aware of the cutie little green Pazuzu face of young Regan, but since I don t believe in the main theme of the story, I knew I wouldn t be able to appreciate the film, right Wrong I admit I should have watched it sooner I wasn t scared, however, only a little bit disgusted, but it was unsettling and full of interesting underlying information about psychology and the mentality behind the cases where exorcisms sounded as the best solution Not to mention Max Von Sydow s formidable presence Therefore, I eagerly searched for the novel and stared reading to appreciate the story under a new light.So, just as I believed, the novel is very, very good Better than the film, its impact was felt immediately, and I must confess that I avoided reading it when I was alone in my house I don t know why, but it made me nervous in a way the movie never did To watch Regan s trip down to Hell, to anticipate the beginning of the child s ordeal was trully, trully agonizing Naturally, this was possible due to the power of the author s writing Blatty uses short sentences and everyday speech and the narration becomes muchimmediate and the imagespowerful Certain infamous scenes of the film are a lotgraphic and highly disturbing in the book.As in the film, my favourite character was Father Karras I have a soft spot for him partly due to him being Greek but I feel that he represents the heart of the story The struggle to seek the answers to his questions, the doubts over his faith and the agony to help in the name of God, the insecurity and lack of faith to himself and his abilities as a priest and as a doctor, are issues that are daily relevant to a significant number of people On the other hand, I never warmed to the character of Chris, Regan s mother I admired the fact that she was down to earth and close to her daughter as much as possible, given her demanding profession, but for some reason, I consider her rather naive and a bit stupid, to be honest Perhaps I am a little harsher than I should, but her interactions with Regan s doctors and with Karras didn t exactly make her look like the sharpest knife in the drawer.So, a great book that would have been a success even if the film had never come to pass A loud applause to the producers who allowed Blatty to handle his own book and transfer it to the big screen, and the results are obvious in a well made film that opened new paths to the Horror genre, Of course, on a personal note, it still can t hold a candle toThe OmenOh, and that scene view spoiler Yes, the spider walkIt s in the book, obviously, and may I say, it is even creepier than in the film I had nightmares with this hide spoiler My mother took me to see The Exorcist at a drive in theater as part of a double feature with Texas Chainsaw Massacre when I was nine years old NINE YEARS OLD I say AT THE DRIVE IN And we LIVED IN TEXAS Scared the living shit out of me The Exorcist permanently scarred my little girl psyche and undoubtedly contributed to my love of dark and morbid stories To this day it is still the scariest movie I have ever seen The book Not so much. THE EXORCIST is on quite a few of my favorite lists.I have read this book once before, and I own and have watched the movie numerous times This time I listened to the audio book.It is my favorite movie poster.It has one of my favorite the making of documentaries It s in my top ten favorite movie list, and top five favorite horror movie listand now that I have listened to the audio book Favorite audio bookby far.William Blatty s voice is like butterslathered on the perfect horror f THE EXORCIST is on quite a few of my favorite lists.I have read this book once before, and I own and have watched the movie numerous times This time I listened to the audio book.It is my favorite movie poster.It has one of my favorite the making of documentaries It s in my top ten favorite movie list, and top five favorite horror movie listand now that I have listened to the audio book Favorite audio bookby far.William Blatty s voice is like butterslathered on the perfect horror filled bagel with cream cheese.Georgetown, Washington Chris MacNeil an actress, and her young daughter Regan are living in Georgetown, while Chris is filming a movie And everything is going along hunky dory until Regan starts playing around with the Ouija board from the attic.Regan starts receiving messages from Captain Howdy who at first, Chris sees as a harmless invisible playmate..until frightening things start happening in Regan s room.After a party at the Georgetown home Chris cannot ignore the fact that something horrible is going on in her house, and with her once so innocent daughterand when a person close to her is killed she knows she must do something drastic and seek help from people she never would have dreamed of asking before.THE EXORCIST I can t recommend it enough The moviethe book, and now the audio book Go Now Watch Read Listen I beg of you WIlliam Peter Blatty s groundbreaking novel caused many waves at the time of its publication, though it is thought that the accompanying movie might have been evencontroversial I chose to embark on this journey,out of curiosity than anything else Knowing the premise, I thought I would indulge before the season of ghouls and other spine tingling things is fully upon us Chris MacNeil is a screen actress and lives in Georgetown with her daughter, Regan Quite the typical twelve, Rega WIlliam Peter Blatty s groundbreaking novel caused many waves at the time of its publication, though it is thought that the accompanying movie might have been evencontroversial I chose to embark on this journey,out of curiosity than anything else Knowing the premise, I thought I would indulge before the season of ghouls and other spine tingling things is fully upon us Chris MacNeil is a screen actress and lives in Georgetown with her daughter, Regan Quite the typical twelve, Regan enjoys some independence, but is happy to engage with her mother on a regular basis When Regan begins to exhibit strange behaviours, Chris cannot help but seek out some medical advice, none of which yields firm answers When the oddities begin to manifest themselves into verbal and physical attacks on others, Chris is left to grasp at straws and is pushed in the direction of a psychiatrist The name she is given, interestingly enough, is Father Damien Karras A Jesuit, Karras works in the parish just on the other side of the MacNeil home When Karras agrees to come visit Regan, he is fearful, yet baffled as well, though will not jump to the idea of possession, even as Chris pushes for an exorcism With no religious ties, the MacNeils seem highly unlikely to have a demon in their lives, but nothing else seems plausible Karras takes an academic approach to the situation and, after numerous encounters with Regan and her alternate personality, he wonders if there might be something to this talk of demonic possession Regan appears to have all the signs and exhibits numerous tendencies that Karras has found in scholarly articles over the centuries With a desecration in the local parish church and the gruesome death of Chris friend, a local homicide detective is poking around, engaging with Karras at every turn, though no one freely shares the goings on in the MacNeil home, which might explain at least part of these occurrences After making his argument to the Church about the needs for some form of Catholic intervention, Karras proceeds to arm himself to enter Regan s domain, ready to do battle with whatever is inside her It is then that things take a turn for the worse and Karras entire being is tested Blatty penned this sensational piece that, even close to a half century later, will still send chills chills up the reader s spine Highly recommended for those who love a great thrill ride and can stomach some graphic descriptions and language.In one of my previous reading challenges, I pushed members to compare a book to its screen adaptation, hoping to see the parallels and great differences Having recently indulged in the cinematic production of this book, it is difficult for me to divorce the two, as they complement one another so well I thoroughly enjoy watching this movie and have done so on multiple occasions While it was produced in 1973 and some of the technology is understandably outdated, it packs a punch and was surely quite thrilling at the time Damien Karras is a central character in the book and his presence is felt throughout, both through his personal struggles with his faith and the dedication he had when thrust into the middle of the demonic possession of a young girl Karras begins as a distant figure, who struggles to come to terms with his mother s illness and, upon her death, seeks to leave the umbrella of the Catholic Church However, his character grows as he becomes a well grounded scholar and seeks to understand what is going on with Regan MacNeil and her obvious struggles with mental stability Chris MacNeil is also a key member of the story and her struggle to understand her daughter proves to be an ongoing theme the reader will discover The angst and utter helplessness is something that any parent would struggle to accept, forcing Chris to turn to the experts, none of whom have the answers she wants One cannot review this book effectively without mentioning Regan and the demon that appears to be embedded within her, as it is this that proves to offer the ultimate spine tingling The struggles the young girl has and the demon displays push the book out of the realm of simple defiance and into an area not seen by many books of the time The raw and unedited language proves useful needed, even to fulfil that complete sentiment of possession Many readers may not like it, as I am sure scores found it problematic when the book was published, but it serves to take the book to a level that makes it all thebelieved A handful of other characters and a few interesting sub plots keep the reader engaged and ready to see where Blatty is taking things The story itself is quite well done and has been able to stand the test of time While exorcisms are no longer commonplace, their allure has not diminished, be it in the published work or cinematic presentation Blatty slowly develops the demonic aspect in such a way that the reader can see it creeping up and spiking at just the right moment Layering the narrative with some key research, revealed by Father Karras, proves to substantiate the larger theme and keeps things from getting too fanciful Those with a strong constitution and who can handle some strong language will surely find something in this book to keep them up late at night I know I ll likely put this on a list of books to read when I want a real chill, though will have to make sure the audio is not streaming when Neo s around Kudos, Mr Blatty, for keeping me enthralled throughout I may have to check out someof your work in the coming months, as you sure know how to tell a story Love hate the review An ever growing collection of others appears at Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge I think I m ready Help Well, maybe I m weird but I found the movie scarier than the book Don t get me wrong, there are a few parts that gave me the heebie jeebies, but overall it didn t get me like the movie Just getting the gifs for this freaking review had me all creeped out This book is very disturbing though Reading the stuff about people in the Black Mass and what they were doing Uggg, no I thought about getting a copy of the movie to watch again since I I think I m ready Help Well, maybe I m weird but I found the movie scarier than the book Don t get me wrong, there are a few parts that gave me the heebie jeebies, but overall it didn t get me like the movie Just getting the gifs for this freaking review had me all creeped out This book is very disturbing though Reading the stuff about people in the Black Mass and what they were doing Uggg, no I thought about getting a copy of the movie to watch again since I have read the book but hell no Just NO The only reason I wanted to watch it again is because I wanted to see if they had some of the really disturbing things in the movie that were in the book I wanted to see if they talked about all of the Black Mass stuff and different things that were in depth in the book because I can t remember any of that stuff it was so long ago I remember when I was younger I had a nightmare that she was coming after me on a bicycle Lol, and it was scary as hell and seemed real A bicycle though, heh There is a part in the prologue that I didn t even realize was in another part of the movie until I read the book It was about the demon when Father Merrin was overseas The man in khaki prowled the ruins The Temple of Nabu The Temple of Ishtar He sifted vibrations At the palace of Ashurbanipal he stopped and looked up at the limestone statue hulking in situ Ragged wings and taloned feet A bulbous, jutting, stubby penis and a mouth stretched taunt in feral grin The demon Pazuzu Abruptly the man in khaki sagged.He bowed his head It was coming He stared at the dust and the quickening shadows The orb of the sun was beginning to slip beneath the rim of the world and he could hear the dim yappings of savage dog packs prowling the fringes of the city He rolled his shirtsleeves down and buttoned them as a shivering breeze sprang up Its source was southwest He hastened toward Mosul and his train, his heart encased in the icy conviction that soon he would be hunted by an ancient enemy whose face he had never seen But he knew his name This all started when Regan started playing with the ouiji board People, just don t do it Regan s mom Chris who is a movie star let her do it because she didn t think there was any harm in it Although, she did have some trepidation when Regan started talking about a Captain Howdy Then things started to happen Chris had Regan taken to all kinds of doctors and psych s until they finally said they need a priest Ya think Chris was able to get in touch with Father Karras through some peeps but he had to spend time with Regan to prove to the Bishop an exorcism was needed The kind of proof he had to look for in the book was ridiculous With all of the stuff going on with Regan they must have been out of their damn mind That should have happened with no problems And then we finally get Father Merrin I loved him and Karras As the stranger reached up to remove his hat, Chris was nodding her head, and then suddenly she was looking into eyes that overwhelmed her tht shone with intelligence and kindly understanding, with serenity that poured from them into her being like the waters of a warm and healing river whose source was both in him and yet somehow beyond him whose flow was contained and yet headlong and endless I m Father Lankester Merrin, he said At any rate, the movie and the book were disturbing Both in their own ways The movie was scarier but the book haddetailed, disturbing stuff Now I can only read normal horror for awhile Enjoy MY BLOG Melissa Martin s Reading List You gotta be impressed with a book that inspires a movie that managed to turn entire generations off of pea soup.Chris MacNeil is an actress who is filming a movie in Georgetown when her young daughter Regan starts to exhibit bizarre behavior, and since medical science fails to provide any answers she turns to Father Damien Karras for blah, blah, blah, blah There s no point in a plot summary because we all know the set up on this one It s also one of those books where the film version has beco You gotta be impressed with a book that inspires a movie that managed to turn entire generations off of pea soup.Chris MacNeil is an actress who is filming a movie in Georgetown when her young daughter Regan starts to exhibit bizarre behavior, and since medical science fails to provide any answers she turns to Father Damien Karras for blah, blah, blah, blah There s no point in a plot summary because we all know the set up on this one It s also one of those books where the film version has become so well known that it s nigh on impossible to separate the two versions In fact, I don t see how anybody could read this without hearing Tubular Bells in their head So just to get this out of the way The movie is better That s not to say that the book is bad Blatty does a very good job of putting us in a normal early 70s setting, and then he slowly turns the dials up from what seem to be mild annoyances to the point where Regan has been turned into a head spinning puppet of the devil I particularly liked how there s a systematic investigation of all the non supernatural explanations for Regan s behavior, and that when the subject of an exorcism is first brought up it s presented as a kind of psychological shock treatment rather than a needed religious ritual The book hasof an underlying theme of questioning whether Regan is possessed that the movie lacks in part because once you see that kid s demonic features and her head spin all the way around on screen, you know it s supernatural in origin Whereas the book can spendtime on the whole question of whether she is or isn t while making the answera bitambiguous Father Karras, a Jesuit psychiatrist suffering from his own crisis of faith, is also a great character to eventually put in the middle of this, and the way he swings from doubt to belief is well done It s also a nice twist that he s kind of secretly hoping that Regan does have a demon in her because it would validate his beliefs That doesn t prevent him from questioning everything and seeking hard evidence to prove it However, I did get a laugh that at this point in the 70s Blatty thought there was enough evidence for the existence of ESP to have Karras consider things like telepathy and telekinesis possible without being demonic in nature So it s a solid horror story that playswith the suspense of making you question what s happening to Regan rather than just making you ascared of the Devil like the movie does One personal note I had been meaning for a while to reread the old paperback I ve had for years as part of my Rubbermaid Treasure reviews, but I just never seemed to get around to it Then Audible had this on sale shortly before Halloween so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to finally get it done It was only after downloading it that I learned that this version is actually the 40th anniversary edition in which the author rewrote parts of it, and since I last read The Exorcist something like 25 years ago I have no idea how much it differs from the original So already this thing has turned from a simple gimmick review to what felt like a pain in the ass Since I don t have the time and or patience to figure out all the differences I won t dig into that, but I m not calling it a Rubbermaid Treasure either since it s technically a different book I know that nobody but me cares about the stupid internal logic I use, but it nags at me if I don t explain what I m doing and why I ll also note that Blatty himself is the narrator for most of it, and it confirms my belief that most authors just shouldn t read their own works aloud Blatty isn t the worst I ve heard, and he seems to delight in evil laughter and doing the demon voice, but this really could have used a professional actor narrator It s even weirder that he reads the Regan parts early on, but then a woman is brought in to do a child s voice later to speak and sing as Regan s actual voice once she is possessed It s just jarring


About the Author: William Peter Blatty

William Peter Blatty was an American writer and filmmaker He wrote the novel The Exorcist 1971 and the subsequent screenplay version for which he won an Academy Award Born and raised in New York City, Blatty received his bachelor s degree in English from the Georgetown University in 1950, and his master s degree in English literature from the George Washington University in 1954 He also wrote and directed the sequel The Exorcist III Some of his other notable works are the novels Elsewhere 2009 , Dimiter 2010 and Crazy 2010.Sourced from Wikipedia