epub True History of the Kelly Gang Author Peter Carey – Andy-palmer.co.uk



10 thoughts on “True History of the Kelly Gang

  1. says:

    This book is a wonder It s interesting that it can be so effective when its artifice is so apparent No one really writes like this No one really uses this bizarre amalgam of heightened vocabulary, slang, and understatement just to read a few pages is proof enough of that The technique is mostly a kind of enjambed, run on sentence style with colorful Australian argot Yet one is completely mesmerized by the book It s pleasures as a narrative are rich and unrelenting My heart pounds and a s This book is a wonder It s interesting that it can be so effective when its artifice is so apparent No one really writes like this No one really uses this bizarre amalgam of heightened vocabulary, slang, and understatement just to read a few pages is proof enough of that The technique is mostly a kind of enjambed, run on sentence style with colorful Australian argot Yet one is completely mesmerized by the book It s pleasures as a narrative are rich and unrelenting My heart pounds and a sympathetic vengeance fills me as I read Ned Kelly s account of the injustices done to him and his family by an out of control police force This should feel painfully familiar to Americans just now As if the dreary damp wretched pitiful lives of these people weren t enough On top of it all they are persecuted as Irish Catholics by a colonial Protestant British establishment One comes to the book with this expectation that it is about this out of control killer and his adherents But halfway through it dawns on you that Ned Kelly as depicted here is a moral hero It is only when he is pushed into a corner that he kills, and then his acts are in self defense Ned s claims of being sought by the police solely for purposes of summary execution without trial are incontrovertible Please look to the many other reviews here for a run down of the plot points Highly recommended


  2. says:

    lmao i definitely didn t read the last 100 pages of this


  3. says:

    Well here I am being a bad person again, I try to be good and I really do like to like things but you all are probably by now getting the strong idea that really I like to dislike things, such as Booker Prize winners and movies with Scarlet Johanssssssen in them They call me Mr Grumpy, baby, cause baby, that s my name. No, Otis Redding did not sing that song, I did Well I did not make it even to the middle of this Kelly Gang saga and the reasons are disturbing for me, that is, not for you P Well here I am being a bad person again, I try to be good and I really do like to like things but you all are probably by now getting the strong idea that really I like to dislike things, such as Booker Prize winners and movies with Scarlet Johanssssssen in them They call me Mr Grumpy, baby, cause baby, that s my name. No, Otis Redding did not sing that song, I did Well I did not make it even to the middle of this Kelly Gang saga and the reasons are disturbing for me, that is, not for you Peter Cary can write well, he s lyrical, and salty, and all that mmmm, smell that kangaroo, taste that kookaburra Ned Kelly, whose unlikely autobiography this is, is sweet and pungent and na ve and knowing and really beautiful, everybody says so and everybody is right You can t get past Peter Carey s front door without shoving aside all the awards which have spilled off his shelves, lots of them for this very novel But when I put this novel down to read a nonfiction zinger about obscure 78 records, and then another nonfiction zinger about the publication history of Ulysses, and then, today, I thought I d better pick Ned Kelly up again finish it, I found a new thought lying around in my brain, and the thought was nah, let s not.It wasn t the fact that this man Ned has perfect recall of every single solitary moment of his life, because that kind of annoying unlikeliness is something I guess you have to go along with because every long first person narrative has a bit of that about it, although it does grate here it wasthe whole illiteratish working class no good Irish bushranger type turns out to be sensitive yet strong courageous yet nice, tough yet tasty, mean yet poetic my God the human admirableness of Ned was laid on with a trowel, I could not tell if Ned was totally in love with himself or if Peter Carey was totally in love with Ned his creature But fatally for me, this whole cool Ned thing became cute. He was cute He was romantic He was like the guy in the Shangri Las song Oh yeah Well I hear he s bad Mmmm he s good bad, but he s not evil So this was shaping up to be a claustrophobically told cowboy yarn think The Outlaw Josey Wales or High Plains Drifter with a dash of Unforgiven and with another 237 pages to go I got off of my roan mare with the splash of silver over its left eye and stuffed a jumbuck in my tucker bag and scrambled over the billabong back to the 21st century


  4. says:

    This fascinating novel from Man Booker prize winner Peter Carey explores the story of the deadly Kelly Gang from the perspective of one of the Kellys The Kelly gang has an interesting role in Australian history as a band of renegades that were treated like shit by society and forced or not depending on how you view it to take to a life of brigandry to survive They were brutally hunted down by the Aussie government but the hunt took years and cost many lives The book is exciting and very wel This fascinating novel from Man Booker prize winner Peter Carey explores the story of the deadly Kelly Gang from the perspective of one of the Kellys The Kelly gang has an interesting role in Australian history as a band of renegades that were treated like shit by society and forced or not depending on how you view it to take to a life of brigandry to survive They were brutally hunted down by the Aussie government but the hunt took years and cost many lives The book is exciting and very well written as well written as Oscar and Lucinda which I adored as well Highly recommended as a portrait of early 20th C badlands in Australia


  5. says:

    Finally, a true history of the Kelly gang No doubt, you ve long suspected all those other tales about the outlaws who terrorized Australia in the 1870s were infected with English prejudice or Aussie pride If you want the real scoop, you ve got to read Ned Kelly s own words God s honest truth as brought to us in Peter Carey s avalanche of a novel I know what it is to be raised on lies and silences, the legendary bushranger writes to a daughter he will never see You are presently too you Finally, a true history of the Kelly gang No doubt, you ve long suspected all those other tales about the outlaws who terrorized Australia in the 1870s were infected with English prejudice or Aussie pride If you want the real scoop, you ve got to read Ned Kelly s own words God s honest truth as brought to us in Peter Carey s avalanche of a novel I know what it is to be raised on lies and silences, the legendary bushranger writes to a daughter he will never see You are presently too young to understand a word I write but this history is for you and will contain no single lie may I burn in hell if I speak false If that s not a gunshot of dramatic irony, what is But Ned s breathless testimony quickly submerges all skepticism You can t help but hope he ll somehow outrun the English landlords, the army of police, and even the record of history that insists he was hung in a Melbourne prison at the age of 26.With this remarkable novel, Carey has raised a national legend to the level of an international myth If the world thinks of America through the voice of Huck Finn, from now on they ll think of Australia through the testimony of Ned Kelly.Born into a large family of Irish immigrants, Ned should have lived a life of quiet contentment I once imagined there were never a better place on earth than where I lived at Pleurisy Plains, he writes I could not conceive a better soil or prettier view or trees that did not grow crooked in the winds But Ned s good nature isn t enough to spare him from the assaults of English injustice At school, he endures a barrage of dispiriting prejudice The police harass his family relentlessly All my life all I wanted were a home, he sighs, but the authorities are determined to catch his relations stealing or lying or fighting or drinking anything to put one of them away in the gaol and encourage the remaining clan to move out.Ned struggles to be good, but his mother, a woman of monumental selfishness, apprentices him to a stagecoach thief With Harry Power, he learns the finer points of robbing, intimidating, and hiding in the outback He were a dirty liar, Ned notes with his signature style It were his great hobby and profession he done it continuously like another man might pick his nose or carve faces on a bit of mallee root just to pass the time Despite his mother s treachery, Ned remains unfailingly committed to her with a kind of devotion even his friends in this pre Freudian age think is peculiar He works for her, brings lovers back to her, builds a new house for her, and defends her against a government determined to take her farm and split up her family.After three years in jail, Ned emerges aflame with Irish pride I were already travelling full tilt towards the man I would become Injustice put me in a rage nothing would ease it but danger I now craved it like another man might lust for the raw burn of poteen For 20 months, Ned and a small band of devoted friends manage to rob banks, elude the law, and help the poor a la Robin Hood It s a series of crises told in a voice so full of passion and anger and innocence that it moves even beyond the boundaries of grammar.His friends and young wife plead with him to flee to America, but he won t leave his mother in jail And unlike Huck Finn, poor Ned Kelly can t light out for the territory He s already there.Beneath Ned s rousing proclamations of imminent victory, tragedy rises toward a crescendo of blood Intoxicated by his own invulnerability, he gradually twists into the kind of dictator he once railed against I were the terror of the government being brung to life in the cauldron of the night, he writes I wished only to be a citizen I had tried to speak but the mongrels stole my tongue when I asked for justice they give me none In this bracing narrative, Carey has given Kelly back his tongue with a style that rips like a falling tree The Australia born author is something of a genius in these acts of literary ventriloquism His last novel, Jack Maggs, raced through the spectacular tale of Pip s benefactor, a minor character from Charles Dickens s Great Expectations There can be no doubt this is the true history of Ned Kelly, but it scomplex than Ned realizes In one of many moments of painful disillusionment, he writes, Thus did the truth appear but in a lightning flash like a fish jumping at the evening rise and by the time I saw it there were nothing left but ripples Carey is a man who isn t afraid to stand in water during lightning and tell us what it s like.Ron Charles was the Monitor s book editor Now he s a book critic at The Washington Post c Copyright 2001 The Christian Science Publishing Societyhttps www.csmonitor.com 2001 0118 p


  6. says:

    Let s start at the beginning At the front cover, in fact The first thing you notice is that this is not The True History , not even A True History No, it is simply True History Even before the reader opens the book to read, there s the hint of a question, of some ambiguity what exactly are we reading In several senses, the title is also misleading the contents of the book are not all true and only about a quarter of the book involves the Kelly Gang the gang does not form until Let s start at the beginning At the front cover, in fact The first thing you notice is that this is not The True History , not even A True History No, it is simply True History Even before the reader opens the book to read, there s the hint of a question, of some ambiguity what exactly are we reading In several senses, the title is also misleading the contents of the book are not all true and only about a quarter of the book involves the Kelly Gang the gang does not form until very late in the book As I understand the author s goal, it is in the narrative voice of Ned Kelly that the ambition for truth is found.And it certainly is a compelling voice Carey has written something that brings his protagonist to life in the mind of the reader The narrative contains no punctuation other than full stops and even many of those are missing if you go by normal grammar standards and it reads like Ned Kelly talking to directly to you This is also a consequence of the book s structure which is framed as a series of parcels of documents written by Kelly directly to his daughter for her to read later in life.If you know anything about Kelly I admit to knowing very little , I imagine you are now saying His daughter Kelly didn t have a daughter And you are right None of the parcels, the daughter or the daughter s mother Mary Hearn actually existed But many of the book s other characters are real and many of the events of the book did take place Carey has created a fictionalised version of Kelly s story that brings his relationship with his mother and with the fictional woman he loves to the fore, at least equal with his battles with the police who chase him around the country In Carey s story, a lot of Kelly s motivation, especially towards the end of the book, comes from his desire to see his mother released from prison and re united with her baby The overall effect of this is to present us with a farsympathetic view of Kelly than is, I understand, usual.Interviewed not long after the book s publication 2001 , Carey was asked about his motivation for writing the book In one interview, he referred to a need to understand Australia s convict past being fundamental to its future And he went on to say non italicised words added by me to try to make sense of the sentenceIt is not just our convict past, but one ofthe two big issues in our lives is that we began as a convict colony and the other is that we invaded another person s country and took it from them and then pretended that we didn t There is a great tendency to deny both of these things and I feel we can t grow up as a nation until until we come to grips with these things Our convict past is a big and traumatic history I think in the last 10 years we have started to acknowledge these things It seems to me that the past does matter The book contains several passages the talk about social injustice At one point, Kelly writes to his daughterbut you must also remember your ancestors would not kowtow to no one and this were a fine rare thing in a colony made specifically to have poor men bow down to their gaolers And we read a lot about the social conditions that meant law enforcement could easily pervert the course of justice by fabricating charges, bribing witnesses or, sometimes, simply ignoring the truth and putting a man in prison anyway.As I say, I do not know a lot about Kelly This book, with its mixture of fact and fiction, is a very engaging book to read and I thoroughly enjoyed it, but it probably should not be the only book a person reads about Kelly if that person wants to know the truth I imagine that knowing or learning the truth will also increase a reader s appreciation of how clever Carey has been in the construction of his novel


  7. says:

    If, like me, you don t know anything about Ned Kelly when you start this book, don t be scared off by the first two pages with the killer robot That will all become clear later Really, between the cover design, the killer robot, and the difficult style, I thought I was going to hate this book Halfway through it, I realized I was totally in love with it It was this paragraph that really did it for me We thought you doomed and rooned the minute you walked out past the chook house and Wild deli If, like me, you don t know anything about Ned Kelly when you start this book, don t be scared off by the first two pages with the killer robot That will all become clear later Really, between the cover design, the killer robot, and the difficult style, I thought I was going to hate this book Halfway through it, I realized I was totally in love with it It was this paragraph that really did it for me We thought you doomed and rooned the minute you walked out past the chook house and Wild delivered that great sidearm to your head and you was on the floor before you even stepped up to the scratch It were a proddy pub so no one give an eff what happened to a mick they planned to drink your blood Wild had heard you had been mocking Dummy and now he were for the kill 178 Awesome


  8. says:

    Beautifully written I loved this telling of the Ned Kelly Kelly Gang story, they all felt incredibly alive to me as I read it I have added two of the biographies on Ned Kelly that Peter Carey mentions in his acknowledgments, and may read the others too He has inspired me to continue learning about this, though I ll give his novel time to digest first I had a rough idea of the plot going in, since this is a historical figure I don t think that can be helped, in fact it may even add to the exp Beautifully written I loved this telling of the Ned Kelly Kelly Gang story, they all felt incredibly alive to me as I read it I have added two of the biographies on Ned Kelly that Peter Carey mentions in his acknowledgments, and may read the others too He has inspired me to continue learning about this, though I ll give his novel time to digest first I had a rough idea of the plot going in, since this is a historical figure I don t think that can be helped, in fact it may even add to the experience, knowing what it is all inevitably building toward Peter Carey really captures the harshness of the time, the place and the people An undeniably fascinating bit of Australian history told in a fictional format


  9. says:

    I loved Peter Carey s Oscar and Lucinda wasn t quite so keen on Jack Maggs this is my favourite to date Ned Kelly is Australia s version of Jesse James or Billy the Kid A loveable outlaw fighting against institutional injustice and to feed his family He tells his story in the first person with wonderful inventive language He perhaps stretches the truth to flatter his role in it but all of us do this when we tell our own stories and eventually he completely won me over and I was rooting for I loved Peter Carey s Oscar and Lucinda wasn t quite so keen on Jack Maggs this is my favourite to date Ned Kelly is Australia s version of Jesse James or Billy the Kid A loveable outlaw fighting against institutional injustice and to feed his family He tells his story in the first person with wonderful inventive language He perhaps stretches the truth to flatter his role in it but all of us do this when we tell our own stories and eventually he completely won me over and I was rooting for him It s an exciting novel with lots of dramatic tension at the same time as being a very literary novel A wonderful combination for me Wholly recommended


  10. says:

    Description In True History of the Kelly Gang, the legendary Ned Kelly speaks for himself, scribbling his narrative on errant scraps of paper in semiliterate but magically descriptive prose as he flees from the police To his pursuers, Kelly is nothing but a monstrous criminal, a thief and a murderer To his own people, the lowly class of ordinary Australians, the bushranger is a hero, defying the authority of the English to direct their lives Indentured by his bootlegger mother to a famous Description In True History of the Kelly Gang, the legendary Ned Kelly speaks for himself, scribbling his narrative on errant scraps of paper in semiliterate but magically descriptive prose as he flees from the police To his pursuers, Kelly is nothing but a monstrous criminal, a thief and a murderer To his own people, the lowly class of ordinary Australians, the bushranger is a hero, defying the authority of the English to direct their lives Indentured by his bootlegger mother to a famous horse thief who was also her lover , Ned saw his first prison cell at 15 and by the age of 26 had become the most wanted man in the wild colony of Victoria, taking over whole towns and defying the law until he was finally captured and hanged Here is a classic outlaw tale, made alive by the skill of a great novelist Opening LOST MY OWN FATHER AT 12 yr of age and know what it is to be raised on lies and silences my dear daughter you are presently too young to understand a word I write but this history is for you and will contain no single lie may I burn in Hell if I speak false.God willing I shall live to see you read these words to witness your astonishment and see your dark eyes widen and your jaw drop when you finally comprehend the injustice we poor Irish suffered in this present age How queer and foreign it must seem to you and all the coarse words and cruelty which I now relate are far away in ancient time.I seem to like the idea of Peter Carey rather than results, and have some flisters that I m in awe of who really rate Carey s work Mick Jagger Ned Kelly FragmentsJohnny Cash Ned Kelly 2 True History of the Kelly Gang3 Parrot and Olivier in America2 Jack Maggs3 Bliss2 The Chemistry of TearsTR 30 Days in Sydney2 The Big Bahzoohley


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True History of the Kelly Gang I lost my own father atyr of age and know what it is to be raised on lies and silences my dear daughter you are presently too young to understand a word I write but this history is for you and will contain no single lie may I burn in Hell if I speak false In True History of the Kelly Gang , the legendary Ned Kelly speaks for himself, scribbling his narrative on errant scraps of paper in semiliterate but magically descriptive prose as he flees from the police To his pursuers, Kelly is nothing but a monstrous criminal, a thief and a murderer To his own people, the lowly class of ordinary Australians, the bushranger is a hero, defying the authority of the English to direct their lives Indentured by his bootlegger mother to a famous horse thief who was also her lover , Ned saw his first prison cell atand by the age ofhad become the most wanted man in the wild colony of Victoria, taking over whole towns and defying the law until he was finally captured and hanged Here is a classic outlaw tale, made alive by the skill of a great novelist