{read online eBook} You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself Author David McRaney – Andy-palmer.co.uk

You Are Not So Smart: Why You Have Too Many Friends on Facebook, Why Your Memory Is Mostly Fiction, and 46 Other Ways You're Deluding Yourself I love Radiolab It is the best thing Here are the episodes that you should listen to instead of reading this book Deception and Forgetting the other ones Mmmmm Radiolab.The good thing about YANSS WYHTMFOFWYMISFA46OWYDY, as I l I love Radiolab It is the best thing Here are the episodes that you should listen to instead of reading this book Deception and Forgetting the other ones Mmmmm Radiolab.The good thing about YANSS WYHTMFOFWYMISFA46OWYDY, as I like to abbreviate it, is the sheer accretion of self delusions There are a lot of them, and McRaney presents a compelling case that we are profoundly self delusional creatures.The bad thing about YANSS WYHTMFOFWYMISFA46OWYDY is the storytelling This book is littlethan a long list of studies Plus, if you ve ever studied Psychology at all or listened to Radiolab Did I mention that you should listen to Radiolab , most of this will already be familiar to you One trap that McRaney didn t mention is the one that he consistently falls into confusing correlation with causality Very few of the studies that this book describes establish causality As such, many, if not most of the conclusions that the book derives are simply not rigorous This foray into pop science has proven unsatisfying I m not sure yet if I dislike the genre or if this was just a bad example We have endless internal dialogues that assist with interpretation of information and decision making based on what we know , feel , and think it s right but the truth is we are all delusional somehow All of us think we re smarter than everyone else , just like we believe that we re better looking, funnier,attractive andlikeable andgenerally competent than everyone else Of course we re not , we are naturally hindered into thinking in certain ways and not others, and the We have endless internal dialogues that assist with interpretation of information and decision making based on what we know , feel , and think it s right but the truth is we are all delusional somehow All of us think we re smarter than everyone else , just like we believe that we re better looking, funnier,attractive andlikeable andgenerally competent than everyone else Of course we re not , we are naturally hindered into thinking in certain ways and not others, and the world around us is the product of dealing with these biases, not overcoming them The three main subjects in this book are cognitive biases, heuristics, and logical fallacies These are components of your mind Cognitive biases cognitive biases are predicable patterns of thought and behavior that lead you to draw incorrect conclusions, You and everyone else come into the world preloaded with these pesky and completely wrong ways of seeing things, and you rarely notice them Many of them serve to keep you confident in your own perceptions or to inhibit you from seeing yourself as a buffoon The maintenance of a positive self image seems to be so important to the human mind you have evolved mental mechanisms designed to make you feel awesome about yourself We tend to like people who think like us If we agree with someone s beliefs, we relikely to be friends with them While this makes sense, it means that we subconsciously begin to ignore or dismiss anything that threatens our world views, since we surround ourselves with people and information that confirm what we already think For example Hindsight BiasTHE MISCONCEPTION After you learn something new, you remember how you were once ignorant or wrong.THE TRUTH You often look back on the things you ve just learned and assume you knew them or believed them all along I KNEW IT You tend to edit your memories so you don t seem like such a dimwit when things happen you couldn t have predicted When you learn things you wish you had known all along, you go ahead and assume you did know them This tendency is just part of being a person, and it is called the Hindsight Bias another example IntrospectionTHE MISCONCEPTION You know why you like the things you like and feel the way you feel.THE TRUTH The origin of certain emotional states is unavailable to you, and when pressed to explain them, you will just make something up.You think you know why you like what you like but if someone asks you Why you like that book or painting or music according to research, your explanation is probably going to be total bullshit , when you are faced with a decision in which you are forced to think about your rationale, you start to turn the volume in your emotional brain down and the volume in your logical brain up You start creating a mental list of pros and cons that would never have been conjured up if you had gone with your gut As Wilson noted in his research, Forming preferences is akin to riding a bicycle we can do it easily but cannot easily explain how heuristics Heuristics are mental shortcuts you use to solve common problems They speed up processing in the brain, but sometimes make you think so fast you miss what is important Instead of taking the long way around and deeply contemplating the best course of action or the most logical train of thought, you use heuristics to arrive at a conclusion in record time Some heuristics are learned, and others come free with every copy of the human brain When they work, they help your mind stay frugal When they don t, you see the world as a much simpler place than it really is logical fallacies Logical fallacies are like math problems involving language, in which you skip a step or get turned around without realizing it They are arguments in your mind where you reach a conclusion without all the facts because you don t care to hear them or have no idea how limited your information is You become a bumbling detective Logical fallacies can also be the result of wishful thinking Sometimes you apply good logic to false premises at other times you apply bad logic to the truth For instance, if you hear Albert Einstein refused to eat scrambled eggs, you might assume scrambled eggs are probably bad for you This is called the argument from authority You assume if someone is super smart, then all of that person s decisions must be good ones, but maybe Einstein just had peculiar taste.With each new subject in this book you will start to see yourself in a new way Theyou try to analyze it theyou hurt your brain This great work boils down to Despite millions of years of evolution your brain is a jumbled mess of neurons that covers up it s downfalls by lying to you constantly Here are just 46 ways your brain is being an asshole Just like Dawkins argues against a creator in showing that evolutionary adaptations can be flawed and seemingly badly designed, David McRaney shows in this work that despite those claims that the human mind is one of the most complex structures in the known universe, it s shod This great work boils down to Despite millions of years of evolution your brain is a jumbled mess of neurons that covers up it s downfalls by lying to you constantly Here are just 46 ways your brain is being an asshole Just like Dawkins argues against a creator in showing that evolutionary adaptations can be flawed and seemingly badly designed, David McRaney shows in this work that despite those claims that the human mind is one of the most complex structures in the known universe, it s shoddily put together, with bits that don t work together and bits that were added on at the last minute and that the only way it works is that it constantly lies to itself about the reality it exists in You have in your head a used car salesman.David demonstrates the limitations of our brains by picking out these 46 different ways our brain lies to us and writing a small chapter on each Each lie is well researched and refers to different published studies for evidence For example the chapter on why you have too many Facebook friends talks about studies about the limitations of how many people you can hold in a social circle in the physical world and compares these figures to the data on Facebook He also talks about the reason why you befriend all those people using the internet.Most interesting are the chapters that highlight the limitations in vision and the comprehension of sensory input You are not a little person in a box watching a ultra high definition surround sound movie of your existence More like your homonculus watches a scratchy silent movie from 1908 with no sound and missing film cells, a friend tells them about the soundtrack over the phone.There are also great chapters on how you think you are better than everyone else out there He actually gives statistics on how many people think they are better than average drivers and how many people think they have a better than average IQ The figures will astound you.I highly recommend this fun and enlightening read It certainly will make you question everything you think and perceive, which is a practice that all science endorses strongly This book is so muchthan your average pop psychology book that litters the popular science section of bookshops and libraries It holds no punches and approaches the subject from a critical standpoint Weeks after reading this book I m still laughing at my brain when I know it s lying to me Readers Beware NEVER believe a book that presents all or nothing concepts as absolute truth And that s exactly what David McRaney s book attempts to do Each chapter identifies a Misconception and a Truth attempting to persuade the reader to believe The Truth as the author sees itbiased and supported with biased, shallow research What the author fails to do is provide evidence to the contrary He presents a very subjective, one sided argument in favor of his beliefs on a variety Readers Beware NEVER believe a book that presents all or nothing concepts as absolute truth And that s exactly what David McRaney s book attempts to do Each chapter identifies a Misconception and a Truth attempting to persuade the reader to believe The Truth as the author sees itbiased and supported with biased, shallow research What the author fails to do is provide evidence to the contrary He presents a very subjective, one sided argument in favor of his beliefs on a variety of so called myths and facts.For example, one chapter titled The Bystander Effect states this misconception When someone is hurt, people rush to their aid and the truth as Thepeople who witness a person in distress, the less likely it is that any one person will help The author defines this truth evensimply I could help them, but I m sure someone else will come along Followed by Everyone thinks that And no one stops.Is David McRaney for real True, this phenomenon has been researched and proven to be credible among social psychologists, BUT it is NOT an all inclusive exclusive doctrinal truth for the entire human population David McRaney chooses not include the rest of the story He lists only specific, well known events that prove his point But what about the population of people that have stepped in to help someone who was hurt Where are those studies Non existent Maybe Why Because they are incidental You might hear about some altruistic stranger who came to someone s rescue on the evening news every now and then, but that s about it.I have personally experienced a few emergency situations among a crowd and the Bystander Effect was never the case Sweeping conclusions that present outcomes as either black or white are very dangerous This author is irresponsible at best and deceptive at worst I will concede that some of the chapters do provide food for thought , especially The Straw Man Fallacy which addresses how we attempt to win an argument by re framing our opponent s position i.e.making it personal, etc The only conclusion one can glean from this book is that the misconceptions and truths David McRaney identifies are unprovable Circumstantial Biased To lump the behavior of the majority of the human population into these boxed fallacies is insulting.If you re a free thinker, creative problem solver, or desire to see the whole picture beyond the elephant s trunk , then this book will most likely be a waste of timeunless of course anger spurs you to action In that case, I would make it a case study The way this book is written is SO condescending Every chapter he says You are not so smart , but when it comes to himself I guess that doesn t apply Why do I say this, you ask Well chapter 2 is all about confabulation, view spoiler Confabulation is a memory disturbance, defined as the production of fabricated, distorted or misinterpreted memories about oneself or the world, without the conscious intention to deceive hide spoiler , and he says that everybody does this so much and so oft The way this book is written is SO condescending Every chapter he says You are not so smart , but when it comes to himself I guess that doesn t apply Why do I say this, you ask Well chapter 2 is all about confabulation, view spoiler Confabulation is a memory disturbance, defined as the production of fabricated, distorted or misinterpreted memories about oneself or the world, without the conscious intention to deceive hide spoiler , and he says that everybody does this so much and so often that we can never be sure about facts And then chapter 4 is about Hindsight Bias, how you look back on things and even if you didn t know them or had a feeling that the opposite would happened you would subconsciously change it to make yourself right Well considering just these two chapters, how can he be so sure that he s correct when he s tell us something that happen to him In chapter 7 he clearly remembers how smart he was when hurricane Katrina was on its way how he was one of the only people stocking up on weeks worth of supplies, while others were only getting a couple days worth Here s a quote from that chapter When Hurricane Katrina bore down on my home in Mississippi, I remember going to the grocery store for food, water, and supplies and being shocked by the number of people who had only a few loaves of bread and couple bottles of soda in their carts I remember their frustration as they waited behind me with all my bottled water and canned goods I told them, Sorry, but you can never be too prepared Their response I don t think it s going to be that big of a deal I often wonder what those people did for the two weeks we were without electricity and the roads were impassable Maybe the majority of people wouldn t be able to solve the puzzles in this book, but I found most of them to be very easy and think others would too, so it was annoying how after giving his little tests he would say You are not so smart.I didn t like this book and don t recommend it This is a fun, pop psychology book that kept me interested from beginning to end It is arranged into 48 chapters, each devoted to a different misconception that we are all subject to Some of these misconceptions have technical names that will be unfamiliar to most people For example, I never heard of apophenia , which is the idea that coincidences are so miraculous, they must have meaning The truth is that Coincidences are a routine part of life, even the seemingly miraculous ones Any m This is a fun, pop psychology book that kept me interested from beginning to end It is arranged into 48 chapters, each devoted to a different misconception that we are all subject to Some of these misconceptions have technical names that will be unfamiliar to most people For example, I never heard of apophenia , which is the idea that coincidences are so miraculous, they must have meaning The truth is that Coincidences are a routine part of life, even the seemingly miraculous ones Any meaning applied to them comes from your mind Another misconception is Brand Loyalty This is the idea that you prefer the things you own over those you don t, because of rational choices you made The truth is that you prefer things that you own, because you rationalize your past choices to protect your sense of self Retailers understand this misconception, and try to prevent you from suffering from buyer s remorse The expectation misconception is a classic Wine experts can be fooled by altering their expectations Experiments have shown that putting wines into bottles with cheap or expensive labels can alter the expectations of wine drinkers and experts alike, thus changing their opinions of wine quality Some manufacturers put high prices on their products in order to persuade consumers of their high quality I think of this, when I see high priced headphones of certain brands.Many of the misconceptions are described in terms of classic psychology experiments They are all fun to read, and made me laugh at myself The only problem is that I ve read about most of these experiments in other books That is the problem with pop psychology books after a while, they repeat the very same material over and over.I do wish the book had an index Here I am trying to remember where I read various anecdotes and experiments, and I am at a loss as to where to find them Many of the chapters reiterate, You are not so smart So, the tone of the book might rub some readers the wrong way But I felt like it was just written that way to add a bit of humor, not to be condescending like to think that I know just how advertisers are trying to sway my thoughts and opinions and gain my buying power I also like to think that I am in complete control of such things as my thoughts, opinions, and buying power But, evidently, I am not so smart.I like the color red I also like to think that I know exactly why I like the color red But, David McRaney says that I am not so smart.I like to think that I am a good person who would rush to the help of others in an emergency I also li like to think that I know just how advertisers are trying to sway my thoughts and opinions and gain my buying power I also like to think that I am in complete control of such things as my thoughts, opinions, and buying power But, evidently, I am not so smart.I like the color red I also like to think that I know exactly why I like the color red But, David McRaney says that I am not so smart.I like to think that I am a good person who would rush to the help of others in an emergency I also like to think that I can think quickly on my feet and would know exactly what to do in such an emergency But the book I just read tells me that I am not so smart Sometimes I like to think that I would have no idea what to do in an emergency Just so we re clear that at least sometimes I m smart Maybe I like having friends I also like having Facebook friends I like havingthan 150 Facebook friends But apparently, I am not smart enough to havethan that You know because I AM NOT SO SMART.I could go on, but I will spare you, and let you read about it for yourself in David McRaney s new book You Are Not So Smart though I bet you were smart enough to figure out that that was the title already which is based on his popular blog by the same name that I wasn t smart enough to hear about before now, but have now read daily since.McRaney has taken his blog and moved it to book format with small, blog sized chapters which announce a misconception when you are around others, you feel as if everyone is noticing every aspect of your appearance and behavior and a reality people devote little attention to you unless prompted to McRaney then uses psychological studies and examples to explain the misconception du jour and help us all understand exactly how not smart we are.Fascinating stuff, people I really enjoyed reading it It s the kind of stuff that I can really eat up because it is just so interesting.That said, I found myself being just the teensyist bit angry at the lack of control I have in my life Everything around me is apparently manipulating my thoughts and views and I am so unaware of it that I make up lies and reasons to explain my actions I also don t like how psychology and the brain are the everything Some of the studies and misconceptions truths don t match up with my religious views Especially my beliefs that God answers prayers and that the Holy Ghost can lead and guide us through personal revelation I m sure that my brain does play a part in that, but I don t think it s ALL my brain.But then, I am not so smart We think we re really smart, that we are much better than the stupid people around us, but in reality, our brains take shortcuts to make situations easier for us to handle This book divulges 48 ways that show we aren t really all that smart.This isn t so much a full review as just my brief impressions Which are, in one word WOW This book was incredible to read I spent an entire 2 hour flight reading this, unable to put it down and read my fiction books Some of these examples I had heard of We think we re really smart, that we are much better than the stupid people around us, but in reality, our brains take shortcuts to make situations easier for us to handle This book divulges 48 ways that show we aren t really all that smart.This isn t so much a full review as just my brief impressions Which are, in one word WOW This book was incredible to read I spent an entire 2 hour flight reading this, unable to put it down and read my fiction books Some of these examples I had heard of before such as the Invisible Gorilla experiment and how we rewrite our memories Others just astounded me, such as how our brains can t really holdthan about 150 people or the many ways we are bad at statistics Affect Heuristic, Illusion of Control, etc I thought it was particularly clever how McRaney made sure in each section to say you are not so smart at least once it never came off repetitive or condescending.About the only complaint I have is how some of these 48 examples overlap, such as with Aprophenia and Consistency Bias It was sometimes difficult to differentiate the differences or, I should say, understand why the author split the two items apart instead of tie them together It did kinda irk me that the Just World Fallacy was the explanation for blaming a woman s rape on her dress or going out at night Sure, some of it may contribute, but I doubt that victim blaming can be 100% attributed to our brains misfiring like this Also, the book hints that men and women think differently I still think that society has something to do with that.But really, don t take these complaints too much to heart they are VERY mild and barely mentioned It s a fascinating look at our brains, how we think, and how we can try to overcome some of these fallacies to berounded individuals Highly recommended An Entertaining Illumination Of The Stupid Beliefs That Make Us Feel Wise Whether You Re Deciding Which Smart Phone To Purchase Or Which Politician To Believe, You Think You Are A Rational Being Whose Every Decision Is Based On Cool, Detached Logic, But Here S The Truth You Are Not So Smart You Re Just As Deluded As The Rest Of Us But That S Okay, Because Being Deluded Is Part Of Being Human Growing Out Of David McRaney S Popular Blog, You Are Not So Smart Reveals That Every Decision We Make, Every Thought We Contemplate, And Every Emotion We Feel Comes With A Story We Tell Ourselves To Explain Them, But Often These Stories Aren T True Each Short Chapter Covering Topics Such As Learned Helplessness, Selling Out, And The Illusion Of Transparency Is Like A Psychology Course With All The Boring Parts Taken OutBringing Together Popular Science And Psychology With Humor And Wit, You Are Not So Smart Is A Celebration Of Our Irrational, Thoroughly Human Behavior I enjoyed this book immensely and I found that I could identify many of my own flaws laid bare in these pages Mr McRaney explains how we have been hardwired to act in certain ways ever since we swung down from the trees and elaborates on how these vestigial impulses and instincts affect how we act and think today Want to know why you overeat or why you procrastinate It s all right here.I think the book is very well organized McRaney touches on so many topics pertaining to our thoughts and ac I enjoyed this book immensely and I found that I could identify many of my own flaws laid bare in these pages Mr McRaney explains how we have been hardwired to act in certain ways ever since we swung down from the trees and elaborates on how these vestigial impulses and instincts affect how we act and think today Want to know why you overeat or why you procrastinate It s all right here.I think the book is very well organized McRaney touches on so many topics pertaining to our thoughts and actions that to go in depth on each topic he would have had to write fifty thick books How many ponderous volumes have been written strictly on memory, for example He has handled the problem perfectly, providing enough information to give a broad understanding of each topic and then moving on to the next chapter This has the benefit of providing information without bogging the reader down in extraneous detail.Sadly, although I finished the book very recently, I don t remember a lot of itbut then, I also can t remember why I originally walked into this room One thing for sure, I ll be buying a copy of this brilliant publication because I ll be reading it again

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